Author Archives: Mickey Rowe

About Mickey Rowe

Mickey Rowe was the first autistic actor to play Christopher Boone in the Tony Award winning play The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and one of the first autistic actors to get to play any autistic character. He has been featured in the New York Times, PBS, Teen Vogue, Playbill, NPR, CNN, Huffington Post, Salon, has keynoted at organizations including Lincoln Center, The Kennedy Center, Yale School of Drama, and more. He is completing his MFA in Artistic Leadership. Mickey has worked with Syracuse Stage, Indiana Repertory Theatre, the Seattle Opera, SCT, Seattle Shakespeare Company, Book-It Repertory Theatre, The Ashland New Plays Festival, Oregon Shakespeare Festival Midnight Projects, The Eugene O’Neill Theater Center, and the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. He is a juggler, stilt walker, unicyclist, hat manipulator, acrobat, and more. Mickey Rowe is co executive director of National Disability Theatre.

CNN’s Great Big Story

(Scroll down for New York Times review NPR audio and more)

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Reviews

The New York Times, Laura Collins-Hughes:  “Mr. Rowe plays Christopher with an agile grace, an impish humor and a humanizing restraint. On Broadway, where the play was a Tony Award-winning hit, it ran eight times a week, with two actors … Continue reading

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Teen Vogue

To read Mickey Rowe’s writing for Teen Vogue click here.

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NPR’s Here and Now

NPR’s Here and Now interviews Mickey Rowe and Risa Brainin:

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National Endowment for the Arts: Art Works Podcast. Mickey Rowe Working with Autism.

https://www.arts.gov/sites/default/files/mickey-rowe-podcast-final-042116.mp3

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Evening Magazine: Shining a Spotlight on the Spectrum

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Our Differences are our Strenghts: Howlround Article

Our Differences are our Strengths: Neurodiversity in Theatre by Mickey Rowe

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